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Upcoming Auditions


 

Adult Auditions, 2017-2018 Season

The Glass Menagerie, January 15 & 16, 2018 at 7:30PM (see below for audition scenes and character breakdown)

A Room with a View, March 5 & 6, 2018 at 7:30PM

Boeing Boeing, April 16 & 17, 2018 at 7:30PM

Hello Dolly, May 7 & 8, 2018 at 7:30pm

Theatre Casting Details

SCENES YOU’LL BE ASKED TO READ AT “THE GLASS MENAGERIE” AUDITIONS

GM audition sides

CHARACTER BREAKDOWN FOR “THE GLASS MENAGERIE”

Amanda Wingfield – mid-40s to 50
Once a Southern belle who was the darling of her small town’s social scene, Amanda is now an abandoned wife and single mother living in a small apartment in St. Louis. She dreams of her past and of her daughter’s future, but seems unwilling to recognize the painful harsh realities of the present. She is a loving mother, but her demands make life difficult for Laura and unbearable for Tom. Amanda finally senses Tom’s stirrings to leave and makes a deal with him – that if he can find a suitable replacement for himself in the form of a husband for Laura, then he can disappear for good. In all reality, then, Amanda is holding her son hostage – threatening his future in order to ensure her own.

Laura Wingfield – 23 years old
Crippled from childhood, Laura walked with the aid of a leg brace when she was a student, but now as a young woman she depends mostly on a wheelchair. Laura is painfully shy, unable to face the world outside of the tiny Wingfield apartment. She spends her time polishing her collection of tiny glass animals, her “glass menagerie.” Her presence is almost ghostly, and her inability to connect with others outside of her family makes her dependent on Tom and Amanda. Jim’s nickname for her, “Blue Roses,” suggests both her odd beauty and her isolation, as blue roses exist nowhere in the real world. She is in many ways like Rose, Tennessee Williams’ real-life sister. As a parallel to Rose, then, Laura becomes helpless and impossibly passive – rendered to a fate entirely dictated by Tom’s own decisions. Laura’s passivity, meanwhile, incurs a tremendous amount of guilt and repressed rage in Tom, who has trouble leaving as long as he thinks of his sister.

Young Tom Wingfield – 21 years old
Old Tom Wingfield – 60-90 years old
GLASS MENAGERIE is a memory play; Tom Wingfield is the central character, and the gateway through which we see the scenes from 1937. Old Tom is in the present and speaks directly to the audience; Young Tom is in the past and is seen with his family in the memory scenes. Young Tom is haunted by unrealized dreams and unfair expectations; Old Tom is haunted by the sister he abandoned years ago and his inability to exorcize those memories. Both men are trapped; Young Tom tried to escape by leaving his family forever – Old Tom tries to escape by revisiting this story in the hopes it will turn out differently, or that he will finally find a solution to assuage his crushing guilt.

Tom is an aspiring poet who works in the Continental Shoemakers warehouse. Tom loves his mother and sister, but he feels trapped at home. They are dependent on his wages and as long as he stays with them he feels he can never have a life of his own. Nightly, he disappears to “go to the movies.” As the play continues, Tom feels increasingly imprisoned and his mother begins to sense his stirrings. She makes him a deal – as long as he finds a husband for Laura, he’s free to escape.

Jim O’Connor – 21 years old
Jim is the long-awaited gentleman caller for Laura – and the supposed prospect for her matrimony. He is outgoing, enthusiastic, and believes in self-improvement. He kisses Laura and raises her hopes that they might be together, before he finally reveals to her that he is engaged. Tom describes him as a person more connected to the real world than any of the other characters.


 

Youth Theatre Auditions, 2017-2018 Season

All Youth Theatre auditions, except for Beauty and the Beast are held on Mondays and Tuesdays, 4:30PM – 6:30PM. Beauty and The Beast Auditions are held Monday and Tuesday, 7:30 PM – 9:30 PM. Come a few minutes early to fill out the audition form.

HOUSE AT POOH CORNER – December 18 & 19

A YEAR WITH FROG AND TOAD – January 8 & 9

Youth Theatre Casting Details

 


 

Frequently Asked Questions About Auditions

Where do I park?

You can park in the lot right across from the Theatre Centre. It is free to park there IF you will pick up a parking pass inside and place it in your car before you audition.

There are two days of auditions, do I come to both?

The short answer is: “no.” You can come to either Monday or Tuesday, whichever works best for you. Please don’t come to both audition days, it doesn’t help your chances of getting a role; however, the callbacks for the show will usually be held on Thursday following the audition, so if you have a conflict that day, please let us know at the audition.

Is it okay to arrive at 7:30 pm for the audition?

Sort of. Yes, if you have to hurry from school or work to get here by 7:30 pm; that is fine. Just be aware that there is an audition form that must be filled out before you can audition, so if you can arrive 15-30 minutes early, it would be less stressful for you and more helpful for us if you can have that done by 7:30 pm.

Do I need to prepare a monologue or a song?

No, when we hold auditions for a musical, we will teach you a short part of a song and a short movement piece or dance combination. For plays and musicals, if there is a scene we want you to read, we will provide that, too. The only preparation necessary is that you have a list of ANY conflicts you might have with rehearsal. This is vital! We MUST know any days you will miss in ADVANCE of casting. Any conflicts not shared with the production team at that time will mean that the actor will forfeit their role.

What is the rehearsal schedule?

Rehearsals for most productions begin soon after auditions and our rehearsal schedule is usually Sunday through Thursday from 7:30 – 10:30 pm – For Miracle, the schedule might be different. The final rehearsal schedule, however, will be based on the conflicts given by the actors at the time of the audition; this is why that information is so critical.

Other questions?
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