Announcing the 2018-2019 Miss Annie Award Nominees

The Miss Annies, our annual volunteer recognition party, are coming up Saturday, August 24. It’s our chance to recognize all of our volunteers for the contributions they made toward making the 2018-2019 season such a great success.

Awards will be given for outstanding onstage performances in several categories, as well as for contributions off stage and behind the scenes.

Here are the nominees for the Miss Annie Awards for performances:

The NOMINEES for OUTSTANDING LEADING ACTOR in a MUSICAL are:

Normand Caissie as Jack Kelly in Newsies

John Thomas Cecil as Jamie in The Last Five Years

Christian Smith as Princeton in Avenue Q

Garrett Henson-Hinck as Seymour in Little Shop of Horrors

The NOMINEES for OUTSTANDING LEADING ACTRESS in a MUSICAL are:

Kimberly Rye as Katherine Plumber in Newsies

Jordan Otis as Cathy in The Last Five Years

Greer Caldwell as Kate Monster in Avenue Q

Genna Raborn as Audrey in Little Shop of Horrors

 The NOMINEES for OUTSTANDING SUPPORTING ACTOR in a MUSICAL are:

Austin Massey as Crutchie in Newsies

Donel Soloman as Audrey II (Voice) in Little Shop of Horrors

Normand Caissie as Rod in Avenue Q

Alex Champion as Les in Newsies

The NOMINEES for OUTSTANDING SUPPORTING ACTRESS in a MUSICAL are:

Brandy Johnson as Gary Coleman in Avenue Q

Fiona Barrett as Ronette in Little Shop of Horrors

Dawn Wilson as Medda Larkin in Newsies

Joanna Lewis as Christmas Eve in Avenue Q

The NOMINEES for OUTSTANDING FEATURED ACTOR in a MUSICAL are:

Noah Huseman as Race in Newsies

Bryan Kelly as Trekkie Monster in Avenue Q

Nicholas Lyles as Albert in Newsies

Ben DeWitt as Romeo in Newsies

The NOMINEES for OUTSTANDING FEATURED ACTRESS in a MUSICAL are:

Annie Collins as Girl Bad Idea Bear in Avenue Q

Genna Raborn as Hannah in Newsies

Jordan Bennett as Lucy the Slut in Avenue Q

Marie Dance as Boy Idea Bear in Avenue Q

The NOMINEES for OUTSTANDING DEBUT ACTOR in a MUSICAL are:

Normand Caissie as Jack Kelly in Newsies

Ed Ober as Mr. Mushnick in Little Shop of Horrors

John Thomas Cecil as Jamie in The Last Five Years

Austin Massey as Crutchie in Newsies

Alex J. Ford as Orin in Little Shop of Horrors

The NOMINEES for OUTSTANDING DEBUT ACTRESS in a MUSICAL are:

Jessi Faircloth as Mover in The Last Five Years

Fiona Barrett as Ronette in Little Shop of Horrors

Jordan Kristan as Chiffon in Little Shop of Horrors

McKenna Hardin as Crystal in Little Shop of Horrors

The NOMINEES for OUTSTANDING LEADING ACTOR in a PLAY are:

Mateen Muhammad El as Troy Maxson in Fences

Chris Barr as Abraham Lincoln in Civil War Christmas

Chen Zhang as Simon Mostyn in Murder on the Nile

Doug May as Canon Ambrose Pennefather in Murder on the Nile

The NOMINEES for OUTSTANDING LEADING ACTRESS in a PLAY are:

E’tienne F. Easley as Rose in Fences

Nicole Coleman as Elizabeth Keckley in Civil War Christmas

Becky Byrns as Mary Todd Lincoln in Civil War Christmas

Jinny Jagoditsch as Jacqueline de Severac in Murder on the Nile

The NOMINEES for OUTSTANDING SUPPORTING ACTOR in a PLAY are:

Carlos Davis as Jim Bono in Fences

Caleb Golson as Cory in Fences

John McCune as Gen. Grant, Weichmann, Nicolay, Ensemble in Civil War Christmas

Gabriel Bailey as Willy Mack, Freddy Wormley, Walker Lewis, Ensemble in Civil War Christmas

The NOMINEES for OUTSTANDING SUPPORTING ACTRESS in a PLAY are:

Kelseigh Garrett as Kay Ridgeway-Mostyn in Murder on the Nile

Sally Peixoto as Christina Grant in Murder on the Nile

Deb Meeks as Helen Ffoliot-ffoulkes in Murder on the Nile

The NOMINEES for OUTSTANDING FEATURED ACTOR in a PLAY are:

Jeffrey Pinkerton as Gabriel in Fences

William Elston as Lyons in Fences

LaFrederick Thirkill as Mr. Wormely, Phillip Reid, Ensemble in Civil War Christmas

James Daniel Frost as Gen. Lee, Lamon, Louis Payne, Ensemble in Civil War Christmas

 The NOMINEES for OUTSTANDING FEATURED ACTRESS in a PLAY are:

Nyla Jacks as Raynell in Fences

Alexis Newson as Jenny Wormley, George Keckley, Ensemble in Civil War Christmas

Cora Grace Williams as Jessa. Little Joe, Ensemble in Civil War Christmas

Kimberly Reynolds as Ely Parker, Mrs. Thomas, Pendel, Ensemble in Civil War Christmas

 The NOMINEES for OUTSTANDING DEBUT ACTOR in a PLAY are:

Caleb Golson as Cory in Fences

Gabriel Bailey as Willy Mack, Freddy Wormley, Walker Lewis, Ensemble in Civil War Christmas

William Elston as Lyons in Fences

Carlos Davis as Jim Bono in Fences

John McCune as Gen. Grant, Weichmann, Nicolay, Ensemble in Civil War Christmas

James Daniel Frost as Gen. Lee, Lamon, Louis Payne, Ensemble in Civil War Christmas

The NOMINEES for OUTSTANDING DEBUT ACTRESS in a PLAY are:

Nyla Jacks as Raynell in Fences

Kimberly Reynolds as Ely Parker, Mrs. Thomas, Pendel, Ensemble in Civil War Christmas

Lee Preston as Mary Surratt, Matron, Ensemble in Civil War Christmas

The event starts at 7:00 p.m.
Posted August 16, 2019

CTC Seeks Master Carpenter

CHATTANOOGA THEATRE CENTRE seeks Master Carpenter. Will report to Technical Director. Build and install 8 shows plus assist on 3 Youth Theatre productions. Must have working knowledge of carpentry, print reading, theatrical construction methods, basic rigging, and shop safety practices. Ideal for recent graduate. Must be a self-motivated team player and good collaborator. Candidates with lighting, sound, and/or welding experience a plus. Part-time 30 hrs/wk, $15/hr plus possibility of full-time employment. Email cover letter and resume to Todd Olson, Executive Director, at [email protected] Reviewing process will begin immediately. No calls please.

CTC Seeks Artists for Lobby Gallery Walls

The Chattanooga Theatre Centre is looking for artists to showcase on two gallery walls during the 2019-2020 season. Artists would need to hang their show along with any relevant info and would keep 100% of any sales.

There are 11 slots open:

During run of Roald Dahl’s MATILDA (September 20-October 13) in the mainstage gallery
During the run of LION KING, JR. (October 25-November 3) in the mainstage gallery
During the run of MARY POPPINS (November 22-December 22) in the mainstage gallery
During the run of James Baldwin’s AMEN CORNER (December 6-22) in the Circle lobby
During the run of August Wilson’s GEM OF THE OCEAN (January 24-February 16) in the Circle lobby
During the run of LION, THE WITCH, AND THE WARDROBE (February 21-29) in the mainstage gallery
During the run of Agatha Christie’s THE HOLLOW (March 13-29) in the mainstage gallery
During the run of Neil Simon’s LAUGHTER ON THE 23RD FLOOR (March 27-April 19) in the Circle lobby
During the run of DR. SEUSS’S THE CAT IN THE HAT (May 9-17) in the Circle lobby
During the run of DREAMGIRLS (May 29-June 21) in the mainstage gallery
During the run of MAMMA MIA (July 17-August 9) in the mainstage gallery

Contact Executive Director Todd Olson at [email protected].

Hit “Love, Loss & What I Wore” Returns for Encore Performance August 10

Women’s relationships and attire—and at times the interaction of the two—use the female wardrobe as a time capsule of a woman’s life in the Chattanooga Theatre Centre’s upcoming benefit performance of the comedy, “Love, Loss and What I Wore,” on Saturday, August 10. The show is back by popular demand after a capacity audience was wowed by the show in March.

An Off-Broadway hit by celebrated writers Nora and Delia Ephron, the one-night-only performance will bring to the stage five prominent members of the community. Appearing in the narrator role of Gingy, a wise woman who reminisces about what she wore at milestones in her life, is Alice Lupton Smith, a community leader and veteran of the CTC stage. Joining her are Lakweshia Ewing, Becki Jordan, Alison Lebovitz, and Kristina Montague.

The show, presented as a staged reading, consists of 28 interwoven stories that seek to illuminate the female identity. Through a series of humorous and often poignant monologues, the actresses share their characters’ stories, exploring themes of relationships, oppression, loss of loved ones, divorce, sexuality (particularly relevant in the Me Too era), and the fullness of life through the metaphor of the characters’ love/hate relationship with clothes.

The actresses each play a variety of characters, transitioning between ages, accents, and attitudes. With monologues about first-date outfits, lucky underwear, prom dresses, buying bras, favorite boots, wedding dresses, miniskirts, the little black dress, high heels, the disorganized purse, and nightmare experiences in the dressing room, the recollections prompt the women’s memories about their mothers, boyfriends, husbands, ex-husbands, sisters, children, and grandchildren.

Among the stories, notable tales revolve around the influence of Madonna (“any woman under 40 who says she’s never dressed as Madonna is either lying or Amish”) and mothers’ taste in clothes (“I don’t understand, you could look so good if you tried”). Other stories include recollections about the dress purchased for the date with a guy who subsequently married someone else, the foibles of spandex bras that result in a look known as the monoboob, and the choice of adorning a newly reconstructed breast with a tattoo.

First produced in 2009, the play is the work of sisters Nora Ephron (“Sleepless in Seattle,” “When Harry Met Sally”) and Delia Ephron (“You’ve Got Mail,” “The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants”), based on the best-selling book by Ilene Beckerman. Nora Ephron wrote the introduction to Beckerman’s 1995 book, which she immediately thought had dramatic possibilities. Once she decided to adapt it into a play, she and her sister emailed 100 women for stories. The play has been produced frequently with celebrities in the roles.

The evening, a fundraiser for the theatre, will include an elaborate spread of hors d’oeuvres and dessert bites. The reception begins at 7 p.m. and the performance begins at 8 p.m. The show is rated R for mature language and themes.

Tickets are $50 and are available at the Theatre Centre box office at (423) 267-8534 or online at TheatreCentre.com.

Posted July 15, 2019

Theatre Centre Launches Playwrights Residency Program

The Chattanooga Theatre Centre is looking for three playwrights for our inaugural Playwrights Residency Program for the 2019-2020 season. The goal of this program is to support new work by offering playwrights space, actors, and support with which they may develop new works in a loose, semi-structured schedule.

You will be a resident for the 2019-2020 season, during which you may use CTC facilities and resources to advance your play(s). There will be no monetary compensation, however you will have full access to volunteer actors, rehearsal halls, and theatres, and may organize public readings when work is ready.

The deadline for submissions is August 1. Selected residents will be notified by September 1. The residency itself will last from September 19, 2019, to August 20, 2020.

Fee: No fee

Restrictions: Must be able to travel to Chattanooga, TN

Submission Method: Email

Eligibility: You must be able to travel to the Chattanooga area, and you may pursue more than one work in progress for this program. Playwrights of all backgrounds are eligible to apply.

Submission Requirements:

·      One writing sample (full-length plays and one-act plays are acceptable)
·      No musicals, 10-minute plays, or one-person plays
·      Minimum of three characters
·      Any coherent writing format is acceptable
·      The document(s) must be in PDF format. No name or any other writer contact information can be on the writing samples themselves.
·      Include cover letter describing your background, experience, and what you hope to gain from this residency.
·      Include synopsis and character breakdown
·      Please e-mail all submissions to [email protected] with the subject line “CTC Playwrights Residence”.

Posted July 3, 2019

Theatre Centre’s “Little Shop of Horrors” Sprouts Musical Fun July 12-August 4

Feed the need for musical hilarity with the Chattanooga Theatre Centre’s production of a “Little Shop of Horrors,” a deviously delicious sci-fi smash about a man-eating plant, opening Friday, July 12, and running through Sunday, August 4.

A tongue-in-cheek Broadway and Hollywood musical with a taste of a B-movie melodrama, “Little Shop of Horrors” has devoured the hearts of theatre goers for over 30 years. Before moving on to Disney fame, composer Alan Menken and writer Howard Ashman reimagined a 1960 movie of the same name for the stage, which premiered Off-Broadway in 1982. It inspired a 1986 film adaptation and ultimately became one of the longest-running productions in Off-Broadway history.

The Theatre Centre brings to the stage this comic musical, which features an electrifying 1960’s pop/rock, doo-wop, and Motown score performed by a cast of 14, including a Greek chorus that guides the audience through the story, and a live band of local musicians.

As the story goes, meek Seymour Krelborn is working as a clerk in cranky Mr. Mushnik’s run-down flower shop on New York City’s Skid Row. Feeling worthless and unappreciated, things take a turn for the better when he stumbles across a new breed of plant resembling a Venus flytrap at a local market. He buys the strange plant, names it Audrey II after his co-worker crush, and places it in his employer’s shop window to attract customers. His plan works, and soon masses of patrons flock to the store to see the mysterious plant.

What Seymour neglects to mention is that the foul-mouthed, R&B-singing plant has an unquenchable thirst for human blood, which multiplies its growth from a tiny potted plant to a human-sized monstrosity. As long as Seymour keeps feeding its appetite, the menacing plant promises him fame, fortune, and most of all, the love of his co-worker Audrey.

Audrey, a pretty ingénue whose fashion sense leans toward the tacky, has problems of her own, secretly longing to leave her abusive boyfriend, a sadistic dentist who drives a motorcycle, wears leather, and enjoys bringing other people pain. A perfect meal for a man-eating plant.

Over time, Seymour discovers Audrey II’s out-of-this-world origins and intent towards global domination. The madness culminates with Seymour and his bloodthirsty plant in a feeding frenzy of epic proportions.

Guest director Magge Cabrera Hudgins, music director John Echols, and choreographer Jessica Laliberte-Bowman lead a cast of CTC favorites and newcomers, including Garrett Henson-Hinck as Seymour and Genna Raborn as Audrey.

The character of Audrey II is played by a series of increasingly large puppets, one a small potted plant, the second slightly larger, and the third large enough to hide a person inside (Annabel Hudgins and Makenna Jordan in alternating performances). The puppeteers move the plant’s mouth in sync with Audrey II’s voice, supplied by an offstage actor (Donel Solomon).

The rest of the cast includes Fiona Barrett, Gabe Biser, Alex Ford, McKenna Hardin, Kade Harrod, Destin Tyler Henry, Abbey Keesee, Jordan Kristan, Ed Ober, and Gwen York. Rodney Strong is the stage manager, and Lauren Rayhab is the assistant stage manager. Cora Grace Williams serves as the production’s intern.

Performance dates are July 12-13 at 8 p.m., July 14 at 2:30 p.m., July 18 at 7 p.m., July 19-20 at 8 p.m., July 21 at 2:30 p.m., July 25 at 7 p.m., July 26-27 at 8 p.m., July 28 at 2:30 p.m., August 1 at 7 p.m., August 2-3 at 8 p.m., and August 4 at 2:30 p.m.

For tickets, call the box office at 423-267-8534 or visit TheatreCentre.com.

Posted June 25, 2019

 

 

 

Theatre Centre Hosts Star-Spangled Supper on July 3

The Chattanooga Theatre Centre is throwing a patriotic party as the annual Star-Spangled Supper returns on Wednesday, July 3. The dinner is held in conjunction with the Pops on the River performance by the Chattanooga Symphony.

Hosted by the Purple Lady Sonia Young, this fundraising event features barbecue by Sugar’s Ribs, ice cream from Clumpies, and wine and beer for sale. There will be live music, and guests can enjoy the symphony concert and the fireworks afterwards from the theatre’s riverfront terrace and lawn. And on a hot, muggy evening, patrons always appreciate the air-conditioned lobby and inside restrooms.

Admission includes free parking. Parking passes must be picked up at the CTC box office by Friday, June 28.

Doors open at 6 p.m., and dinner is served at 6:30 p.m.

Tickets are $50 for adults, $10 for 12 and under, and free for kids 3 and under.

Tickets are available by calling (423) 267-8534 or by visiting TheatreCentre.com. This event usually sells out so the theatre recommends purchasing early.

Posted June 17, 2019

 

 

 

Classic Mystery Meets Film Noir in Theatre Centre’s “Murder on the Nile” May 17-June 16

Idyllic surroundings are shattered by a shocking murder as one would expect from an Agatha Christie mystery story, but with the Chattanooga Theatre Centre’s interpretation of the celebrated writer’s “Murder on the Nile,” opening May 17 and running through June 16, you might feel that you’ve been dropped into the middle of a classic film of yore, not a classic whodunit on the stage.

Guest director Courtenay Gillean Cholovich’s vision for this 1944 favorite of Christie fans has given the CTC stage production an unmistakable film noir twist, a choice reflected through the gray tones of the set and costumes, the use of silhouette, the lighting effects, and the actors’ performances.

Nonetheless, this is live theatre at its best, with a delicious murder mystery giving every character the opportunity to show their best (and worst) selves.

“I was struck by how the language of the play translates from what we know and are used to seeing to the sounds, vocabulary, and cadence of the film noir features of the same era,” Cholovich says. “With this production, I hope to capture the essence of the 1940s genre and translate the black-and-white big screen to live performance both through performance and design elements. The visual and aural soundscapes heighten the sense of mystery and intrigue surrounding the play.”

“Murder on the Nile,” often hilarious and genuinely puzzling, is based on Christie’s 1937 novel “Death on the Nile.” Christie has a wide body of bestselling thrillers and several popular plays to back up the claim that she’s one of the greatest mystery writers of all time.

The entirety of “Murder on the Nile,” considered one of her best, takes place on the observation deck of the Lotus, a paddle steamer chartered by a group of English aristocrats. Nine passengers board the craft, which is heading down the Nile River. Not all will return, of course. What starts as a pleasant diversion to see the sites becomes a thrill ride of jealousy, suspicion, and murder.

We meet Simon Mostyn, who has recently married socialite Kay Ridgeway, a young woman blessed with beauty and enormous wealth. Their honeymoon voyage introduces them to a host of memorable passengers. There is the wealthy old snob and her awestruck niece, the disgruntled gentleman, the foreign doctor, the priest, the maid, and a woman obsessed with the new Mrs. Mostyn’s husband. At various times, each of them seems quite capable of murder.

Fatal circumstances await when the tranquil setting is upended by the brutal murder. The tension and claustrophobia build as a shocking conspiracy is laid bare.

The Theatre Centre cast features Samuel Chase Day, Kelseigh Garrett, Jinny Jagoditsch, Holli Hutson, Deb Meeks, Douglas May, Jacob Moore, Sally Peixoto, Dana Rogers, and Chen Zhang. The stage manager is Sandy Whetmore.

Performance dates for “Murder on the Nile” are May 17-18 at 8 p.m., May 19 at 2:30 p.m., May 23 at 7 p.m., May 24-25 at 8 p.m., May 26 at 2:30 p.m., May 30 at 7 p.m., May 31 and June 1 at 8 p.m., June 2 at 2:30 p.m., June 6 at 7 p.m., June 7-8 at 8 p.m., June 9 at 2:30 p.m., June 13 at 7 p.m., June 14-15 at 8 p.m., and June 16 at 2:30 p.m.

For tickets, call the CTC box office at (423) 267-8534 or visit TheatreCentre.com.

Posted May 3, 2019

 

AVENUE Q’s Raunchy Puppets Take Over CTC Stage May 3-12

 

What is not unusual about the Chattanooga Theatre Centre’s production of the Tony Award-winning musical comedy “Avenue Q” is that it follows a motley group of New York twenty-somethings who face life’s challenges together, struggling to find jobs, dates, and their elusive purpose in life.

What is unusual about the irreverent farce, which opens May 3 for seven performances only, is that three actors share the stage with a group of raunchy, foulmouthed, politically-incorrect puppets, operated and voiced by other actors in full view of the audience. The show runs through May 12.

Any likeness to a long-running public television children’s show is unquestionably implied, but the content – adult themes, colorful language, racy humor, and a brief suggestion of puppet-to-puppet intimacy – confirms that “Avenue Q” is not intended for young audiences.

The musical follows the story of a bright-eyed college grad named Princeton (a puppet), who arrives in the city with big dreams and an empty bank account. He moves into a run-down apartment way out on Avenue Q, where he meets a host of odd neighbors (mostly puppets) who are struggling to find their way too.

There’s Kate Monster (his girl-next-door love interest), Lucy (a promiscuous woman), Rod (a closeted investment banker), Nicky (a slacker just out of college), Trekkie Monster (a lecherous grouch who surfs the internet all day), the Bad Idea Bears (who urge Princeton to make poor choices), Gary Coleman (yes, that Gary Coleman), and others. He soon discovers that, although the residents seem nice, it’s obvious that it’s not your average neighborhood.

With songs like “Everyone’s a Little Bit Racist” and “The Internet Is for Porn,” the musical — created by Robert Lopez and Jeff Marx with a book by Jeff Whitty — was an unusual fit for Broadway when it opened in 2003. However, “Avenue Q” went on to win three Tony Awards in 2004 for best musical, best book, and best original score.

It should be stressed, however, that this show is rated R and contains mature themes, mature language, and mature situations for mature audiences.

Under the direction of the CTC’s Scott Dunlap with music direction by Jennifer Arbogast Wilson, the cast features Jordan Bennett, Normand Caissie, Greer Caldwell, Annie Collins, Marie Dance, Brandy Johnson, Bryan Kelly, Joanna Lewis, Beth McClary-Wolford, Richard Nichols, Will Park, and Christian Smith. The stage managers are Jeremy Campbell and Angie Griffin, and Teralyn Wade is the assistant stage manager.

“Avenue Q” will be presented in a limited run of seven performances. Show dates are May 3-4 at 8 p.m., May 5 at 2:30 p.m., May 9 at 7 p.m., May 10-11 at 8 p.m., and May 12 at 2:30 p.m.

For tickets, call the CTC box office at (423) 267-8534 or visit TheatreCentre.com.

Youth Theatre’s “The Tale of Peter Rabbit” Hops to the Stage March 29-April 7

Defying his mother’s instructions, venturing into dangerous territory, one of the most endearing – and naughty – heroes of children’s literature hops from the page to the stage as the Chattanooga Theatre Centre’s Youth Theatre presents Beatrix Potter’s “The Tale of Peter Rabbit,” March 29 through April 7, 2019.

Under the direction of Youth Theatre director Scott Dunlap, 28 young actors bring the story to life in this faithful stage adaptation of Potter’s book, published in 1902 and one of the best-selling children’s books of all time.

The dramatization centers on the mischievous Peter Rabbit, whose disobedience leads to trouble. The story combines humor and adventure that will have young audiences hopping with delight while also delivering a moral lesson that youngsters can take to heart.

As the tale begins, Peter Rabbit, far more adventurous than his sisters Flopsy, Mopsy and Cottontail, is following the advice of his tummy versus the advice of his mother. Everyone knows that you stay out of Mr. McGregor’s garden, but Peter and his cousin Benjamin Bunny (adopted by this adaptation from another Potter book) squeeze under the garden gate and venture into a world filled with excitement, adventure, and scrumptious vegetables.

Audiences will meet other fun characters such as Caw and Kem, the two silly crows who know that a picket fence could never stop a bird, and the easygoing Cat, just waiting around the garden for her own meal. And, of course, there’s Mr. McGregor, the mean, befuddled farmer, who is willing to go to great lengths to protect his garden.

Ultimately, the angry farmer chases the terrified young rabbits around the garden until they finally locate the gate and return home frightened but a little wiser.

With two casts performing on alternate days, Charlie Clevenger and Bec Fitzsimmons share the role of Peter Rabbit. The casts also include Jaimie Abbott, Riley Brown, Kailey Buttry, Audrey DeCredico, James Derrick, Lucas Gregg, Elise Hall, Cole Hayes, Tytus Hayes, Zachary Huseman, Claire James, Emily James, Emily Johnson, Paul Knotts, Hunter Landreth, Brady Lewis, Lilly Lewis, Megan McGarvey, Ella McGinness, Tilleigh Nazor-Comer, Bennett Russak, Jaelyn Sanders, Autumn Schulmeister, Zachary Schulmeister, Kamaya Sutton, and Lanie Wright. Ella Hogue and Olivia Kelly are the stage managers.

Public performances take place on March 29 and March 30 at 7 p.m. and March 30 and 31 and April 6 and 7 at 2:30 p.m. School performances are scheduled during the week of April 1. The show is appropriate for kindergartners and older.

Tickets are available at the CTC box office at (423) 267-8534 or online at TheatreCentre.com.

Posted on March 20, 2019

Women’s Wardrobes & Wisdom Distinguish CTC’s “Love, Loss & What I Wore” March 9

Women’s relationships and attire—and at times the interaction of the two—use the female wardrobe as a time capsule of a woman’s life in the Chattanooga Theatre Centre’s upcoming benefit performance of the comedy, “Love, Loss and What I Wore,” on Saturday, March 9, at 8 p.m.

An Off-Broadway hit by celebrated writers Nora and Delia Ephron, the one-night-only performance will bring to the stage five prominent members of the community. Appearing in the narrator role of Gingy, a wise woman who reminisces about what she wore at milestones in her life, is Alice Lupton Smith, a community leader and veteran of the CTC stage. Joining her are Lakweshia Ewing, Becki Jordan, Alison Lebovitz, and Kristina Montague.

The reader’s theatre play consists of 28 interwoven stories that seek to illuminate the female identity. Through a series of humorous and often poignant monologues, the actresses share their characters’ stories, exploring themes of relationships, oppression, loss of loved ones, divorce, sexuality (particularly relevant in the Me Too era), and the fullness of life through the metaphor of the characters’ love/hate relationship with clothes.

The actresses each play a variety of characters, transitioning between ages, accents, and attitudes. With monologues about first-date outfits, lucky underwear, prom dresses, buying bras, favorite boots, wedding dresses, miniskirts, the little black dress, high heels, the disorganized purse, and nightmare experiences in the dressing room, the recollections prompt the women’s memories about their mothers, boyfriends, husbands, ex-husbands, sisters, children, and grandchildren.

Among the stories, notable tales revolve around the influence of Madonna (“any woman under 40 who says she’s never dressed as Madonna is either lying or Amish”) and mothers’ taste in clothes (“I don’t understand, you could look so good if you tried”). Other stories include recollections about the dress purchased for the date with a guy who subsequently married someone else, the foibles of spandex bras that result in a look known as the monoboob, and the choice of adorning a newly reconstructed breast with a tattoo.

First produced in 2009, the play is the work of sisters Nora Ephron (“Sleepless in Seattle,” “When Harry Met Sally”) and Delia Ephron (“You’ve Got Mail,” “The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants”), based on the best-selling book by Ilene Beckerman. Nora Ephron wrote the introduction to Beckerman’s 1995 book, which she immediately thought had dramatic possibilities. Once she decided to adapt it into a play, she and her sister emailed 100 women for stories. The play has been produced frequently with celebrities in the roles.

The evening, a fundraiser for the theatre, will include wine and an elaborate spread of hors d’oeuvres and dessert bites catered by the Mountain City Club. The show is rated R for mature language and themes.

Tickets are $50 and are available at the Theatre Centre box office at (423) 267-8534 or online at TheatreCentre.com.

Posted February 26, 2019